Design & Decision-Making: How Architects & Interior Designers Ease The Custom Furniture Process

During the month of April, we at Marshall Furniture decided to hone our focus on all things architectural. Although we focus a lot on our products’ ability to accommodate a wide range of technology, we also strive to make sure each build is a beautiful, one-of-a-kind piece. Even our Quick Ship line, developed as a low-cost alternative to our custom builds, elicits a high-quality feel. During the last thirty plus years of business, our furniture has evolved partly in response to customer, consultant and architect/designer feedback. As a whole, architects and interior designers in particular play an important role in the aesthetics of the custom furniture process. They have experience with what design elements work and are constantly keeping up with the latest design trends. Their ability to translate customer ideas into an architectural illustration acts as a concise framework for a furniture vendor.

Trends change, as we all know, and it’s a designer’s job to keep up with these trends. From the latest sustainable resources to what traditional aspects retain the most value year after year, designers are tasked with consistently updating their knowledge. So, regardless of whether a project needs a modern redesign or a unique incorporation of existing room architecture into a furniture build, a lot of insight can be gained from architects and interior design companies.

In addition to specifying hardware to match your piece, locks to keep your items secure and inlays to accent the surrounding space, the material is another important aspect of an architect’s job.  Recently, many spaces are pressing for sustainable resources throughout their project builds. Ensuring that the wood materials are properly sourced has become just as important as picking between brass or chrome knobs. This focus on responsible forestry is grounded not only in moral concerns but also as an incentive for tax breaks on the customer’s behalf.

Architects will specify specific materials, suppliers or offer a range of suggestions to the furniture vendor to ensure the customer’s piece is utilizing environmentally friendly sources. When it comes to veneer specifically, designers may ask that it be FSC certified. FSC stands for the Forest Stewardship Council, an organization that promotes responsible forestry and offers transparency of the supply process through services like chain of custody. Companies, like Marshall Furniture, who hold certification with FSC would then bring in the properly-sourced material to complete the project. Adding this extra layer of insight to a design build propels a customer’s space into the highly popular realm of “green” living.

As a whole, investing in a professional design team provides a multitude of benefits for both clients and furniture vendors. An architect or interior designer can contribute supplementary design knowledge previously unconsidered by a user. This may move the design forward into a new realm or amplify the existing ideas on the table. For a vendor, this detailed information is a convenient starting point as it allows for a quicker design process and prevents misunderstandings between customer and vendor concerning design concept. Also, since architects and designers often work in-depth with the client to develop their vision, a part of their responsibility includes mediating and interpreting customer/vendor concerns. Their knowledgeable background in construction, materials and design allow them to easily translate the vendor’s questions or construction suggestions to the client.

Whether a project requires a small furniture build or a complete building re-configuration, an architectural firm or interior design company can offer clients valuable knowledge to complete their project successfully. Their presence provides custom furniture suppliers with a clear and concise communication of the customer’s vision, easing the design process on both ends.